13 February 2012 @ 02:53 pm
Do you enjoy to discuss books? Especially "Little Women"? Or do you only want someone else to laugh about Alcotts subtly humour? Or want to see if someone else get the hints against the social norm of that time? Then check this out!

I host a Read-a-long in littlewomen_fic which you can find here...


Mods, I hope this is okay. If not please delete. X-post to various communitys. Sorry for the spam on your f-list.
 
 
 
23 November 2011 @ 03:56 pm
I've posted my review on my own journal, because I'm having problems with LJ again : I can't do a LJ-cut, even using HTML.

My review is here, and it contains a few spoilers. You're welcome to comment either on this journal or on my personnal journal.
 
 
 
30 October 2011 @ 08:27 pm

Since there was only one book nominated for next month, there was no need for a poll. The book for November 2011 is The Call of the Wild by Jack London. You can find the text at Project Gutenberg and several audio versions at LibriVox.org. Happy reading!

 
 
 
23 October 2011 @ 05:20 pm

It's time for nominations for a November book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for a November book. I will leave the nominations open until Wednesday evening, at which point I'll post a poll. As per the rules and policies, books by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Kenneth Grahame and Robert Louis Stevenson are not eligible.

 
 
 

I read this book (actually, listened to an audio recording) 4-5 years ago. The post below contains my thoughts at the time.

This is another of those classics that I've been aware of for as long as I can remember, but had never actually read. Thanks to David Barnes at LibriVox, I listened to a recording of it yesterday and really liked it. It was one of those books where I knew the ending, but the journey was fascinating. Some people might call Stevenson verbose (he used quite a few words to describe rather simple things), but I loved the language. It's not a very long story, and probably could have been told in even fewer words, but I liked all the "ten cent" words that were thrown in. I found that I could really picture the characters and scenes and I like that. Of course, as a scientist, I thought the entire premise was bunk, but that didn't stop me from thinking about the duality of man and some of the other issues raised. In short, I recommend this and if you read it, you'll completely understand why Jekyll/Hyde has become synonymous with split personalities.

 
 
 
21 October 2011 @ 02:17 pm
I literally just finished The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Stevenson . I read this book ten years ago but I didn't remember anything but the most basic plot points, and I decided to pick it up again.

My reviewCollapse )

To sum-up, I enjoyed this book, even if the last chapter was, in my opinion, far weaker than the rest of the story.
 
 
 
26 September 2011 @ 08:58 pm

Well, we only had a single nomination for the October book, so that makes the voting easy. The October 2011 book is The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson. The text and audio are available at Project Gutenberg. The audio is also available at LibriVox.org. Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: sadsad
 
 
 
23 September 2011 @ 07:30 pm

It's time for nominations for an October book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for an October book. I will leave the nominations open until Monday evening, at which point I'll post a poll. As per the rules and policies, books by Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Kenneth Grahame are not eligible.

 
 
Current Mood: grumpygrumpy
 
 
 
31 August 2011 @ 09:53 pm
Despite minimal voting, the winner for September 2011 is The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame. Text/audio are available through Project Gutenberg and LibriVox.org. Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: tiredtired
 
 
 
29 August 2011 @ 09:09 pm
No clear winner, so here's a runoff. I'll leave it open until Wednesday night, when I'll announce the winner.

Poll #1774122 September 2011 runoff poll
This poll is closed.

What book would you like to read in September 2011?

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
4(66.7%)
The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
2(33.3%)

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: rushedrushed
 
 
 
27 August 2011 @ 10:09 pm
We got a few more nominations so here's the poll for the September book. I'll leave it open until Monday night and post a runoff or announce the winner. Happy voting!

Poll #1773386 September 2011 book selection poll
This poll is closed.

What book would you like to read in September 2011?

The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins
1(14.3%)
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
2(28.6%)
Hinds' Feet on High Places by Hannah Hurnard
1(14.3%)
The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
3(42.9%)

Tags:
 
 
 
26 August 2011 @ 05:29 pm

We've only had one nomination for a September book so far. If I don't get another one by tomorrow evening, I'm afraid the community may lapse back into inactivity. Please make a nomination if you have an interest in continuing the community. The nominations post is here. Thanks!

 
 
Current Mood: determineddetermined
 
 
 
25 August 2011 @ 05:33 am

It's time for nominations for a September book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for a September book. I will leave the nominations open until Saturday evening, at which point I'll post a poll. As per the rules and policies, books by Dostoyevsky are not eligible.

I hope that the participation around selecting and reading Crime & Punishment wasn't just a flash in the pan. Hope to hear from you!

 
 
 
26 July 2011 @ 05:23 am

I closed the poll, but when I went to post the announcement, LJ was refusing to load. Sorry! Anyway, there were only three votes to extend the book through August, but there were no votes not to. So, we'll keep plowing through! I'll open up nominations for a September book toward the end of August. Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: groggygroggy
 
 
 
23 July 2011 @ 12:02 pm

Do we need another month? If not, I'll need to open nominations pretty quickly. I'll leave this poll open until Sunday night or Monday morning.

Poll #1764196 July 2011 extension poll
This poll is closed.

Have you read/are you reading/do you plan to read Crime and Punishment?

Read it
0(0.0%)
Reading it
2(50.0%)
Plan to read it
1(25.0%)
Don't plan to read it
1(25.0%)

Would you like to extend Crime and Punishment through August 2011?

Yes
3(100.0%)
No
0(0.0%)

Tags:
 
 
 

I'm on disc 6/16 from the library. I doubt I'll finish by the end of the month (book club meetings today and Wednesday). I haven't seen any other posts about the book either, so I'll post a poll about extending the book through August.

Crime & Punishment/Parts I & II/Where's the punishment?Collapse )

 
 
Current Mood: relaxedrelaxed
 
 
 
01 July 2011 @ 06:05 am

I'd like to extend a warm welcome to both new members and those with revived interest! I wanted to take this opportunity to point to our rules and policies, which are not required to be followed to the letter, but which are intended to provide some guidelines for consistency and fairness. Also, we have read many books over the years, and there's no reason discussion is restricted to a given month. Please do review the tags and feel free (and encouraged!) to post about anything we've read. In my opinion, the whole point of the community is to share and discuss our reading experiences!

On a personal note, despite the fact that I've never really had enjoyable reading experiences with Russian authors, I have requested an audio recording of Crime and Punishment from the library and intend to give it a try.

Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: hopefulhopeful
 
 
 
30 June 2011 @ 09:11 pm

The winner (by a hair!) is Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The text is available through Project Gutenberg and the audio is available at LibriVox.org. I'll check in toward the end of the month and see if we want to extend for a second month, since it's a lengthy novel.

Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: sleepysleepy
 
 
 
28 June 2011 @ 08:08 pm

I'm excited about the great participation level! We've had nearly twice as many votes as the last two polls. The runoff will remain open until Thursday evening, and then I'll announce the winner.

This poll is closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: hothot
 
 
 
26 June 2011 @ 09:16 pm

Due to overwhelming response, about which I am very excited, I'm going to go ahead and post a poll now. I'll leave it open until Tuesday evening and post a runoff if necessary. A huge WELCOME to the new members and thanks for everyone's participation! Maybe this community just needed a two-month break...

This poll is closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: excitedexcited
 
 
 

It's time for nominations for a July book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for a July book. I will leave the nominations open until Tuesday evening, at which point I'll post a poll. Since we're nearly at the end of the month, there will be no runoff, even if one book doesn't get at least half the votes.

I like to think of the community as "not dead yet", so I hope to see some participation!

 
 
Current Mood: hopefulhopeful
 
 
 
29 April 2011 @ 05:36 am

Sorry I didn't post last night. This week is totally crushing me.

So... we only had one book nomination. Is it time to abandon the community? Frankly, you wouldn't think it would take much time to maintain, and it really doesn't in the grand scheme of things, but sometimes the book selection duties coincide with times when I'm insanely busy. I have no problem trying to make the time if the community is at least moderately active, but when we can't even have a poll due to lack of response, I wonder if it's worth it. I'm even worse about posting, too. I actually read the last four books and have utterly failed to post about any of them. Despite that, I have tried to make the book selection process a priority even if it hasn't been convenient for me, but I am really only willing to do that if others make participation a priority as well.

There have been posts of this nature before and there has been a significant response about how we should keep going. To be blunt, actions speak louder than words at this point.

Thoughts?

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: busybusy
 
 
 
26 April 2011 @ 05:33 am

I would have posted this earlier, but I was out of town. It's time for nominations for a May book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for a May book. I will leave the nominations open until Thursday evening, at which point I'll post a poll. Since we're nearly at the end of the month, there will be no runoff, even if one book doesn't get at least half the votes.

As per the rules and policies, the ineligible authors for May are George Eliot, William Shakespeare, Gaston Leroux, H.G. Wells, and Daniel Defoe.

 
 
Current Mood: sleepysleepy
 
 
 
30 March 2011 @ 05:47 am

I got carried away reading a book for one of my book clubs (which meets tonight) and forgot to close the poll. The winner is Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe. You can find the text and two audio versions at Project Gutenberg. There are also two audio versions at LibriVox.org.

Happy reading!

 
 
 
29 March 2011 @ 05:09 am

The April 2011 selection poll will remain open until this evening. There aren't many votes yet, so make sure to get yours in!

Tags:
 
 
 
27 March 2011 @ 08:51 am

I'll leave this open until Tuesday evening, at which point I'll post a runoff poll or announce the winner (if one book gets at least 50% of the votes).

Poll #1723164 April 2011 book selection poll
This poll is closed.

What book would you like to read in April 2011?

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
5(55.6%)
The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling by Henry Fielding
1(11.1%)
Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott
3(33.3%)

Tags:
 
 
 
25 March 2011 @ 05:39 am

It's time for nominations for an April book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for an April book. I will leave the nominations open until Sunday morning, at which point I'll post a poll.

As per the rules and policies, the ineligible authors for April are George Eliot, William Shakespeare, Gaston Leroux, and H.G. Wells.

 
 
 
I'm not sorry I read this novel, but it isn't a book I'll re-read, I guess it was just OK.

Spoilers and my thoughtsCollapse )

To Sum-up : not a great book, the writing was nothing special but still clear and easy to follow, and the plot was straight-forward. I'd recommend this book if you're interested in the history of sci-fi. If you're looking for a likable hero, don't read this book.
 
 
 
26 February 2011 @ 06:34 am

With minimal participation, we already have a winner for March! The March 2011 book selection is The Time Machine by H.G. Wells. The text is available through Project Gutenberg and the audio is available through Project Gutenberg and LibriVox.org.

Happy reading!

 
 
 
23 February 2011 @ 05:14 am

I'll leave this open until Saturday morning, when I'll announce the winner (if one book has at least 50% of the votes) or post a runoff poll.

This poll is now closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: worriedworried
 
 
 
21 February 2011 @ 05:08 am

It's time for nominations for a March book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for a March book. I will leave the nominations open until Wednesday (early) morning, at which point I'll post a poll.

As per the rules and policies, the ineligible authors for March are Gabriel García Márquez, George Eliot, William Shakespeare, and Gaston Leroux.

 
 
Current Mood: grumpygrumpy
Current Music: neighbor shoveling snow
 
 
 
31 January 2011 @ 08:57 pm

The winner, by a landslide, is The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. This one has been in the running quite a few times, and it's about time it was chosen! The text is available at Project Gutenberg and there are a couple audio versions at LibriVox.org. Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: sleepysleepy
 
 
 
28 January 2011 @ 08:34 pm

Well, there were only two nominations so I guess we won't need a runoff poll this month! I'll leave this open until Monday, and announce the winner.

This poll is now closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
 
27 January 2011 @ 08:12 pm

Don't forget to nominate a book by Friday evening, if you feel so inspired.

 
 
Current Mood: sleepysleepy
 
 
 
19 January 2011 @ 08:06 pm

I finished Middlemarch on Monday, in case the music of the celestial choir didn't tip you off. HA! I had to return the audiobook to the library before I was finished because someone else put in a hold request. I read the last 200 pages or so, though I had to take a break to obsessively read/listen to the Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. Anyway, despite the ridiculous length of time it took me to read Middlemarch, it was worth it!

Middlemarch/All Chapters/Yay characters!Collapse )

 
 
Current Mood: relievedrelieved
Current Music: NCIS
 
 
 
11 January 2011 @ 09:33 pm
I've read this book in French (translation by Paul Arnold) : Shakespeare is a bit difficult in the original English, especially since I had no idea what this play was about. I plan to read another translation (I had two at home) and then read the English text.

Like all of Shakespeare's plays and poems I've read, I liked this one, even if I'm always a bit surprised by some of the characters.

Cut because I get a bit wordyCollapse )

I'll stop babbling here, since I'm sure I've said only the most commonplace ideas about this play. I still wanted to write my thoughts down before I read some critics.
 


Tags:
 
 
 
02 January 2011 @ 08:47 pm

I got to spend a chunk of time listening to Middlemarch today (while finishing a beautiful baby blanket, if I do say so myself). I'm more drawn into the story now, and will have to start a new blanket tomorrow rather than stop listening. (ha ha ha)

Middlemarch/Chapters I-XXIX/Self-absorbed menCollapse )

 
 
Current Mood: cynicalcynical
 
 
 
01 January 2011 @ 10:12 pm

And the winner for January 2011 is... The Tempest by William Shakespeare. The text is available all over the internet, but here's a link to Project Gutenberg. An audio recording is available at LibriVox.org.

Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: soresore
Current Music: Fiesta Bowl
 
 
 
30 December 2010 @ 09:15 pm

We had a tie, so here's a runoff poll. I'll leave it open until Saturday night and then announce the winner. Have a nice New Year's Eve!

This poll is now closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: sleepysleepy
 
 
 
28 December 2010 @ 08:46 pm

I'll leave this up until Thursday evening, at which point I'll announce the winner, or post a runoff poll, if necessary.

This poll is now closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: coldcold
 
 
 
26 December 2010 @ 08:30 am

I've tried to read Middlemarch in a timely fashion (for this community, at least), but I've hardly been able to read anything for the last two months. I wanted to listen, but the audiobook was checked out of the public library FOREVER and I've only just gotten my hands on it. I have to say that I was having trouble getting into the story when reading a paper copy, but I do like the reader very much and I think that I will be enjoying it more once I have time to get absorbed (i.e. maybe now that Christmas is past).

Middlemarch/Chapters I-XII/Slow startCollapse )

 
 
Current Mood: busybusy
 
 
 
26 December 2010 @ 08:17 am

I'm very delinquent! I'm sorry! Clearly, I should have tried harder to engineer the book selection process for November and January and skip December, but it didn't work out that way. At any rate, it's time for nominations for a January book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for a January book. I will leave the nominations open until Tuesday afternoon/evening, at which point I'll post a poll.

As per the rules and policies, the ineligible authors for January are Nathaniel Hawthorne, Gabriel García Márquez, and George Eliot.

 
 
Current Mood: blahchagrinned
 
 
 
22 December 2010 @ 08:48 pm
I finished A Christmas Carol and I found it a very good book. But I do have a question about Scrooge.

At the beginning of the novella, Scrooge is misanthropic and uncharitable but I found him very interesting : I had lots of questions about him and what caused him to be so hard-hearted. In short, he was a very intriguing character. As the story develops, Scrooge changes and he soon becomes the advocate of all things good. And I get that it's the message that Dickens wants to convey. But, I sincerely found Scrooge less interesting as a result. When someone is as good as Scrooge ends up being, I simply don't want to read about them. I felt that Dickens "sacrificed" his character to the message of his book. Did anyone feel the same?
 
 
 
20 December 2010 @ 10:40 pm

While browsing the reading list, I saw this com read A Christmas Carol by Dickens in 2006. I'd never read it, and I decided to try it.

I've read the first two staves so far, Marley's Ghost and The First of the Three Spirits, and I'm really enjoying this book. I felt really sympathetic toward Scrooge, especially when the Spirit showed the scene with his fiancée, and I've enjoyed all the descriptions (which I usually skip while reading, but Dickens has a way to describe without being boring).

And I can't resist quoting Scrooge's nephew, during one of the first scenes in the novella:
“There are many things from which I might have derived good, by which I have not profited, I dare say,” returned the nephew. “Christmas among the rest. But I am sure I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round—apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that—as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys. And therefore, uncle, though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that it has done me good, and will do me good; and I say, God bless it!”

I hope you all enjoy your various Christmas books.


 
 
 
01 November 2010 @ 07:30 pm

And the winner is... Middlemarch by George Eliot. This has been on my list for a long time, and I think I needed a nudge to actually read it. Because it is quite long and the holidays are coming up, I'm going to designate this for two months (November-December 2010). I'll take nominations and poll for a new book at the end of December. The book is available through Project Gutenberg in text and audio format. The audio is also available through LibriVox.org. Happy reading!

 
 
Current Mood: coldcold
Current Music: NCIS
 
 
 

I finished this book a little over a week ago, but didn't get around to posting until now. (Better late than never, I guess.) Overall, I liked it. However, something was missing to boost it onto my list of favorites.

Love in the Time of Cholera/All Chapters/What is love?Collapse )

 
 
Current Mood: coldcold
Current Music: Texas vs. Baylor
 
 
 
30 October 2010 @ 01:11 pm

Here's the runoff poll. I'll leave it open until Monday, and make the announcement then.

This poll is closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: rushedrushed
 
 
 
28 October 2010 @ 05:32 am

Sorry I didn't get this posted yesterday. I don't know why I thought I'd be able to when I had book club and got home past my bedtime. Anyway, I'll leave this open until Saturday morning. If one book gets at least 50% of the votes, it will be our selection, otherwise I'll post a runoff poll.

This poll is closed.Collapse )

Tags:
 
 
Current Mood: groggygroggy
 
 
 
24 October 2010 @ 01:38 pm

It's time for nominations for a November book. Please check out "The Library" and then comment in this post with one nomination for a November book. I will leave the nominations open until Wednesday afternoon/evening, at which point I'll post a poll.

As per the rules and policies, the ineligible authors for November are F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charles Dickens, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Gabriel García Márquez.

 
 
Current Mood: lazylazy
 
 
 
16 October 2010 @ 08:40 pm
General Question: Has anyone figured out what country this takes place in? Maybe I just missed it. Though the way Marquez describes the history of the city, it sounds like a combination of Latin American countries.

Any other thoughts about the book at this point?